Nurses Declaration of Solidarity and Resistance


The 2017 U.S. Executive Branch is taking steps that will have an effect on the health and well-being of all who reside within the borders of the United States, and of all people worldwide.  At this moment in history, we call upon nurses to stand together, act to resist that which harms health and well-being, protect those who are harmed, and build coalitions that move toward the ideals we seek.  We stand on a long legacy of political activism by nurses that arises from our moral imperative to actively promote public policy to assure social/health equity. Our actions are grounded in the premise that health and well-being depends on healthy environments and  just communities. We pledge to join with others to engage in determined action to protect health and justice for all, regardless of age, social/economic circumstance, religion, skin color, race, sexual orientation or gender identity.

1. We believe that health and well-being of mind, body and spirit is a fundamental human right.

As nurses, we are committed to provide care for all people – care that promotes and supports high level wellness, prevention and treatment of injury and disease, and restoration of health when it is compromised.  

2. We believe the integrity of our environment is integral to human health and well-being.

We oppose all actions that contribute to damage and erosion of the earth’s ecosystem and the physical structures which we inhabit. We will promote, protect, and support actions toward healthy and sustainable structural and natural environments for all the earth’s inhabitants.   

3. We believe that all people deserve access to affordable quality care.

As nurses, we are committed to caring for all patients and families, regardless of economic status, sexual orientation/gender Identities, current immigration status, age, ability to pay, or spiritual/religious beliefs/practices (or lack thereof).

4. We oppose all forms of oppression and discrimination.

We commit to protect and care for those whose safety and well-being is threatened based on gender, race, ethnicity, nationality, sexual identity, physical ability, economic status, or any other attribute seen as “difference.”  We will take public stands opposing any attempt to weaken public policies and programs designed to protect health and well-being of those who are disadvantaged. We will fight for policies and programs that assure equality and justice.

5. We oppose intimidation and violence in our homes and communities.

We will act to protect any who are victims of intimidation and violence, particularly those who are vulnerable because of skin color, race, sexual orientation, gender identity or religion.  As nurses, we nurture peaceful resolution of conflict and support those who step up to intervene peacefully in situations of threat and danger.

6. We believe that the health of women must be protected.

We will act to assure that all women receive the full range of care that assures their right to control their own reproductive choices as well as all women’s healthcare services needed to maintain their own health and the health of their families.

7. We trust scientific knowledge that supports a wholistic approach to nursing care

We examine all sources of evidence to inform the choices we make in caring for those we serve. We can assure the public that we practice from a firm foundation of sound and reliable scientific evidence. We will take all steps needed to inform the public of the science that supports our practices.

We invite all nurses, and our colleagues who support our values, to join us in declaring these  values and actions by signing this declaration. You can add your signature to this document here.  We invite you to use this declaration as you wish, and revise to suit your own purposes.  Let us know of your actions, follow #nursesresist, and join our Facebook group.

Contributing authors:

Carey S. Clark, PhD, RN, AHN-BC
Peggy Chinn, RN, PhD, FAAN
Elizabeth Berrey, PhD, RN
Lisa Sundean, RN, MS, PhD Candidate
Adeline Falk-Rafael, PhD, FAAN
Leslie Nicoll, PhD, PhD, MBA, RN, FAAN
Sue Hagedorn, RN, PhD, FAAN

Thank you to the Cambridge Health Alliance for inspiration!

If you would like to co-sign your name to this declaration, please provide your information using this formThe list of co-signatories will be updated as frequently as possible.

SEE THE DECLARATION AND LIST OF SIGNATORIES HERE

Call to Action for 2016 NurseManifest Study: Request for Co-Creators


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a quote from The Lorax by Dr. Seuss

You are invited to comment, collaborate, and co-create a global NurseManifest research project, to be carried out later this year.

Previously in 2002 and 2003 we asked nurses what it was like to practice nursing, and what changes they envision to create the conditions for ideal practice, using emancipatory methods.

For 2016 I propose we explore the topic of excellence in nursing care, from the perspective of patients and caregivers, using Appreciative Inquiry.

With a blog readership of over 7,500 people, we now have the capacity to carry out the international study envisioned by the NurseManifest Project founders over a decade ago, and make a global impact through our collective action.

Some critical questions we might ask include:

  • What is like to be the recipient of excellent nursing care?
  • What specifically about your nursing care experience made it excellent?
  • How would healthcare be different if every nursing interaction was excellent?
  • What would it take to create a healthcare system where excellent nursing care is the norm?

Some opportunities to participate include:

  • Host a conversation group with patients and family members who have received care from a single health care organization or network of providers.
  • Host a conversation group with patients and family members who have received care related to a specific condition or life event.
  • Host a conversation with a community group, with co-workers, or even with your own family.

Some ideas for dissemination:

  • Present at national and international conferences in 2017
  • Develop a series of manuscripts for peer-reviewed journals
  • Turn the findings into a book
  • Use the findings to inform a public service campaign about nursing and policies impacting nurses

Please add your ideas in the comments section below this blog entry or write to Olga Jarrín at olga.jarrin@rutgers.edu by June 1, 2016 – in time to have a shared protocol and IRB approval in place for interviews and focus groups to begin in September, 2016.

For more information about Appreciative Inquiry see the website: Appreciative Inquiry Commons. Case Western Reserve University, Weatherhead School of Management. April 18, 2016. *Note: This repository of information Includes Appreciative Inquiry resource materials in 22 languages. https://appreciativeinquiry.case.edu

 

 

Book of the Year Award – twice!


On September 14, 2014, I posted news of the newly published book “Philosophies and Practices of Emancipatory Nursing: Social Justice as Praxis,”  noting its relevance for all NurseManifesters!  The book is edited by Paula Kagan, Marlaine Smith, and Peggy Chinn, and contains 22 original chapters by some of the leading nurse scholars in the area of Emancipatory textcritical inquiry.  The book has gained some attention, but in January, it was awarded two AJN “Book of the Year” awards – in the categories of History and Public Policy, and in Professional Issues.  You can see the press release about all of the awards here.  The link to. the article online is here.  The detailed comments of the reviewers are posted on the web as supplementary digital content; you can access this information online as a subscriber, or through your library.  The book is available in both paper and electronic formats – here is the Amazon link!

We are thrilled with these awards, not just because we know how important this book it, but because it is amazing for a book of this type to gain this kind of recognition in a “field” that typically focuses on very pragmatic and even “technical” topics.  Both of the reviewers who selected the book in their category commented on how accessible the content of the book is, even though much of the focus is on complex philosophic ideas.  If you have not yet had a chance to see the book, consider asking your library for a copy, and take some time to browse, and read!  Share your comments here about the details you see as particularly important for manifesting nursing!

Spiritual consciousness and healing

Gallery


This is my first time posting a blog and the experience has been both exciting and a little uncomfortable. I am moving out of my comfort zone, writing from my heart and soul. I’m thankful for the experience and hope … Continue reading

The Legacy of Paulo Freire


For those who have followed this project for a while, you already are aware of the influence of Brazilian educator Paulo Freire, whose book “The Pedagogy of the Oppressed” has influenced not only this project, but the work of many of us involved with this project.  Recently I became aware of a number of YouTube videos about Freire and his work, some Freirein Portuguese, but many in English! Viewing them reminded me of the importance of returning again and again for inspiration that arises from these ideas — inspiration that keeps our gaze on what is possible and that overcomes the distress that comes from some of the discouraging events that surround us every day!  I will post one of the short videos below, but also want to be sure that everyone knows about the online “Paulo Freire Formation” course offered by the Freire Institute.  Here is a brief description of what this course is all about:

This is an in-depth online programme for activists, organizers and volunteers committed to social transformation. It provides training for those wanting to become more effective change agents. The six courses are taken online but with live input; those progressing to the next part of the programme will have the option to attend a 5-day ‘Intercultural Formation Meeting’. Courses can be taken flexibly according to your needs.

Freire wrote his “Pedagogy” book in the late ’60s, and it was published in English in 1971.  The importance of his ideas has only increased over time, and many important scholars and activists have continued to build on his work, including a number of feminist scholars including bell hooks.  Her book “Teaching to Transgress” contains a full chapter in which she examines Freire’s work and its lasting and significant contribution to feminist thought.

For me, Freire’s ideas have a close connection and deep meaning in terms of our ongoing exploration of what it means to care and to be cared for.  Freire, in his later years, talked more and more about the concept of love – particularly what he called “radical love” – which is quite similar to Margaret Newman’s ideas of love as the highest form of expanded consciousness.  Freire never wavered in his belief that real social change could become a reality, with the essential element of radical love – the coming together of all forms of love – as the underpinning for social change.

So watch this brief video to become more familiar with these ideas, and if you want more, just search for Paulo Freire on YouTube and/or Google, for more than a bit of inspiration!