About peggychinn

feminist, nurse activist, writer, editor of ANS Advances in Nursing Science, quilter, grandmother nurturing the future of the amazing children in my life.

Stand with the ANA


Today, within hours of the US House of Representative acting against the health and well-being of all Americans, the American Nurses Association issued a strong statement opposing this action. While many nurses do not belong to the ANA, it is an important organization with a strong voice for nursing. Here is the press release:

For Immediate Release
May 4, 2017
Contact: Veronica Byrd
301-628-5057
veronica.byrd@ana.org

David L. Allen
301-628-5391
david.allen@ana.org

American Nurses Association Disappointed with the

Passage of the American Health Care Act  

 

SILVER SPRING, MD – The American Nurses Association (ANA) strongly opposed the American Health Care Act (AHCA) and is deeply disappointed with the passage of this legislation by the United States House of Representatives.

ANA, which represents the interests of more than 3.6 million registered nurses, has expressed serious concerns throughout negotiations about the critical impact the AHCA would have on the 24 million people who stand to lose insurance coverage if the bill becomes law.

“Over the past several weeks, nurses from across the country expressed their strong disapproval of this bill which would negatively impact the health of the nation,” said ANA President Pamela F. Cipriano, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN. “Today, Congress not only ignored the voice of the nation’s most honest and ethical profession and largest group of health care professionals, it also ignored the almost 15 million people in the United States with pre-existing conditions who will now have no protection from insurer discrimination.”

As it is currently written, the AHCA would cut Medicaid funding by $880 billion over 10 years, dramatically increase premiums on seniors, restrict millions of women from access to health care, weaken the sustainability of Medicare, and repeal income-based subsidies that have made it possible for millions of families to buy health insurance. In addition, states would have the option to waive essential health benefit protections that prevent insurance companies from charging individuals with pre-existing conditions significantly more for coverage. Even worse, insurers could decline coverage for substance abuse treatment, maternity care, and preventive services. Late efforts to stabilize the bill’s risk pools for more than 15 million people with pre-existing conditions were wholly inadequate and will leave the nation’s sickest vulnerable.

As this legislation moves to the United States Senate, ANA urges the Senate to allow for opportunities for thoughtful, public feedback in the face of reforms that would have such a far-reaching and personal impact across the nation.

ANA asks the Senate to oppose AHCA in its current form, and stands ready to work with Senators to protect and improve health care access, quality and affordability for all.

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The American Nurses Association (ANA) is the premier organization representing the interests of the nation’s 3.6 million registered nurses. ANA advances the nursing profession by fostering high standards of nursing practice, promoting a safe and ethical work environment, bolstering the health and wellness of nurses, and advocating on health care issues that affect nurses and the public. ANA is at the forefront of improving the quality of health care for all. For more information, visit www.nursingworld.org.

If you would rather not receive future communications from American Nurses Association (ANA), let us know by clicking here.
American Nurses Association (ANA), 8515 Georgia Ave, Silver Spring, MD 20910 United States

Nurses Take DC for Safe Nurse:Patient Ratios on May 5!


For a number of years, nurses have marched on DC to call for changes in nursing and healthcare that the conditions under which nurses care for patients.  This year the specific issue is safe nurse:patient ratios, calling for passage of bills that are already in both the House and the Senate that set national standards for nurse:patient ratios.  This event promises to be an invigorating event with inspiring speakers and the opportunity to be part of a strong, non-partisan event focusing on issues of great concern for all nurses.  The march also coincides with the following week designated as “nurses week” – a U.S. tradition highlighting tokenism at its best (full disclosure – my personal opinion!).  The march has the potential to energize nurses across the country to bring the activism home, and during nurses week take local action calling for safe ratios at home – in place of roses!

For more information, visit the Nurses Take DC website.  You can also follow the Nurses Take DC Facebook page, or follow #NursesTakeDC on Twitter.

What is “best nursing care?” Deconstructing the business model driving healthcare


The current feature on the AJN blog “Off the Charts” is a post titled “The Limitations of Rating Nursing Care by Customer Surveys.”  Since I have, for many long years, decried the practice of basing the evaluation of nursing care on patient satisfaction surveys, I jumped at the opportunity to read this post!  Of course we need and want to know how patients perceive the care we provide, but how we obtain this information, and what we do with this, is a key factor.  Since this approach derives fundamentally from the corporate business model, and is now practiced in the context of this model, the substance, use and outcomes of this practice are deeply flawed when examined from a NurseManifest perspective.  The example the author, Juliana Paradisi gives as an example of her best safe and compassionate nursing care involves a woman in extreme distress who “fired” her as her nurse –  a situation in which she could not break through the barriers inherent in the patient’s distress, but provided a level of care that was exemplary.

Even though the overarching business model that governs healthcare now is probably not going to go away soon (Ha!) – we can raise awareness of the limitations that this imposes on our practice, select specific actions to take to place these practices into context, and work to achieve whatever changes we can make.  We can start with addressing the question: “What is best nursing care” from the perspective of the values in the Nursing Manifesto.  There is no single answer to this question – but there are insights to be gained by thinking, talking and writing the ideas that arise from it. Once we have expressed our ideas, we can examine new and better ways to document our care, and continue to address the limitations of the existing practices that fail to document and support our best practices.

We welcome your ideas here – and stories about the times you provided what you think is the best nursing care!

off the charts

The Power of Ten!


Sigma Theta Tau has now published the 2nd Edition of the book “The Power of Ten,” a book of essays by nursing leaders that address ten top issues for nurses to rally around for the next few years.  These issues were identified prior to the results of the 2016 election, and now they are issues of increasing importance!  The essays provide ideas and inspiration for actions to strengthen nursing’s focus and activism.  The issues are:

  1. Educational Reform
  2. Academic Progression
  3. Diversity
  4. Interprofessional collaboration
  5. Systems thinking
  6. Voice of Nursing
  7. Global Stewardship
  8. Practice authority
  9. Delivery of care
  10. Professional handoff

This is an important resource for all nurses who are determined to act on the fundamental values of nursing.  The essays are a follow-up to the 2012 “Future of Nursing” report; the issues dovetail with the four recommendations of the report, and sine a light on the actions that nurses can take now to bring a culture of health to the center in shaping the future of nursing and healthcare.  The essays are short and to the point, and there are inspirational quotes from nursing leaders throughout that point the way forward.

Check it out! The book is available in several different formats directly from Sigma Theta Tau or from Amazon.  All proceeds from the book are being donated in equal parts to the American Red Cross nursing programs and the American Nurses Foundation.