The Call for Community, Art, and Artists in the Resistance Movement


This week, members of the Nurse Manifest Team gathered together by the warmth of our computer screens for engaging video conference. We took the time to welcome some new members and talk about the future of the movement. I have to say for me, being with like minded #NurseResisters was so energizing (even though I have been suffering through a bout of the flu this week!) and also very comforting.

It’s important for #NurseResisters to remember we are not alone and to gather those around us during these challenging times: when change seems to be happening at a rapid pace, when social media pages are filled with what resisters might find to be concerning or bad governmental news, when there are 10 things you would like to take action on, but you can’t be on the phone all day….it can become easy to become discouraged, overwhelmed, or burned out. This is where truly being with a like minded community can lift your spirits and buoy your endurance.

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And endurance is what we will need. I know right now it sometimes feel like a sprint…get out there and get things done now, get to this march, make your signs, write your emails and postcards, get on the phone….because the administration has been creating changes at a rapid pace, the media and social media have been bumping up our energy, and we feel drawn to create change now.

The thing is, this is not a sprint and it’s not a solo race…it’s more like a team based marathon or ultra-marathon, and it is going to take teams of like minded community members to both participate in and complete the race.

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Individual Sprint

Versus

Team Marathon

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We need to carry lights, march together through the dark night with our nightingale lamps, and strive toward unity. There is no clear finish line, and no medals for winners, second, and third place. There is a beautiful planet and population of people that need caring for and this endurance test is in part about not giving up that vision of a caring, compassionate, kind, peaceful, unified, and spirit filled world.

I suggest other #NurseResisters start gathering with your communities in real life or as we did last week, in real time via video or phone conferencing. Set aside thoughtful, meaningful time to be together, to discuss future actions, and also to just support one another, to laugh together, to share your stories. Communities can rejuvenate and recharge us, and they are a must for folks who plan to run the long race.

I also did want to share that part of our discussion last week focused on the use of humor, satire, parody, art, and music to support and gather people together. Saturday Night live is becoming a great example of the power of humor, parody, and satire to help us lighten our load, to help us rejuvenate, to connect us across time and space.

 

 

While there are many older political songs we can use (Carol King just re-released One Small Voice with free download!: https://soundcloud.com/user-844282824/one-small-voice), it remains imperative that we also create new art and new music that reflects our current siutation here, now in 2017. Until then, let’s be strong together:

“One small voice speaking out in honesty
Silenced, but not for long
One small voice speaking with the values
we were taught as children
Tell the truth
You can change the world
But you’d better be strong”

(Carole King/ copyright Rockingdale Records).

 

Guidelines for Resistance


It has been one week since we posted the Nurses Declaration of Solidarity and Resistance, and today we registered 833 signatories, and still counting!  But what matters is that nurses are not only signing this Declaration, but we are acting in our communities all over the world to put the values of this Declaration into action. We have heard from many nurses directly who have said “I have never taken this kind of action before, but now I am doing it.”

Of course not all nurses share the commitment that we have put forward, and we respect any challenge or difference of opinion.  The fact remains that there are hundreds of nurses who, like growing numbers of our colleagues and neighbors, continue to be alarmed by the actions of the new administration.  The book “Don’t Think of an Elephant” by George Lakoff has helped me to understand the perspectives that different people have concerning what is happening in our nation and the world. Recently a friend heard Professor Lakoff speak of central guidelines for resistance – ways to avoid inadvertently helping the new administration, ways to resist, and ways to promote the values that stand on the side of health and justice.  These guidelines can be applied not only to public action, but to our own language and thinking about the situation we are in:

1. Don’t use the name of the new President, and do not repeat his tweets.
2. Remember this is a regime and he’s not acting alone;
3. Do not argue with those who support him–it doesn’t work;
4. Focus on his policies, not his orange-ness and mental state;
5. Keep your message positive; they want the country to be angry and fearful because this is the soil from which their darkest policies will grow.
6. No more helpless/hopeless talk
7. Support artists and the arts
8. Be careful not to spread fake news. Check it.
9. Take care of yourselves; and
10. Resist!

If you have not found your way yet to a place and time to take specific political action.in your community, go to the Indivisible Guide website – and start by searching for groups in or near your zip code.  Read the guide, talk with your friends, explore existing groups or form one of your own.

When you get involved in a group, let everyone know that you are a nurse, and that you are speaking up based on the values that nurses hold dear! Together we can make a difference! And let us know here!  Add your comment to our blog any time to share what you are doing, because your action inspires all of us to act in our own ways and times!

Nurses Declaration of Solidarity and Resistance


The 2017 U.S. Executive Branch is taking steps that will have an effect on the health and well-being of all who reside within the borders of the United States, and of all people worldwide.  At this moment in history, we call upon nurses to stand together, act to resist that which harms health and well-being, protect those who are harmed, and build coalitions that move toward the ideals we seek.  We stand on a long legacy of political activism by nurses that arises from our moral imperative to actively promote public policy to assure social/health equity. Our actions are grounded in the premise that health and well-being depends on healthy environments and  just communities. We pledge to join with others to engage in determined action to protect health and justice for all, regardless of age, social/economic circumstance, religion, skin color, race, sexual orientation or gender identity.

1. We believe that health and well-being of mind, body and spirit is a fundamental human right.

As nurses, we are committed to provide care for all people – care that promotes and supports high level wellness, prevention and treatment of injury and disease, and restoration of health when it is compromised.  

2. We believe the integrity of our environment is integral to human health and well-being.

We oppose all actions that contribute to damage and erosion of the earth’s ecosystem and the physical structures which we inhabit. We will promote, protect, and support actions toward healthy and sustainable structural and natural environments for all the earth’s inhabitants.   

3. We believe that all people deserve access to affordable quality care.

As nurses, we are committed to caring for all patients and families, regardless of economic status, sexual orientation/gender Identities, current immigration status, age, ability to pay, or spiritual/religious beliefs/practices (or lack thereof).

4. We oppose all forms of oppression and discrimination.

We commit to protect and care for those whose safety and well-being is threatened based on gender, race, ethnicity, nationality, sexual identity, physical ability, economic status, or any other attribute seen as “difference.”  We will take public stands opposing any attempt to weaken public policies and programs designed to protect health and well-being of those who are disadvantaged. We will fight for policies and programs that assure equality and justice.

5. We oppose intimidation and violence in our homes and communities.

We will act to protect any who are victims of intimidation and violence, particularly those who are vulnerable because of skin color, race, sexual orientation, gender identity or religion.  As nurses, we nurture peaceful resolution of conflict and support those who step up to intervene peacefully in situations of threat and danger.

6. We believe that the health of women must be protected.

We will act to assure that all women receive the full range of care that assures their right to control their own reproductive choices as well as all women’s healthcare services needed to maintain their own health and the health of their families.

7. We trust scientific knowledge that supports a wholistic approach to nursing care

We examine all sources of evidence to inform the choices we make in caring for those we serve. We can assure the public that we practice from a firm foundation of sound and reliable scientific evidence. We will take all steps needed to inform the public of the science that supports our practices.

We invite all nurses, and our colleagues who support our values, to join us in declaring these  values and actions by signing this declaration. You can add your signature to this document here.  We invite you to use this declaration as you wish, and revise to suit your own purposes.  Let us know of your actions, follow #nursesresist, and join our Facebook group.

Contributing authors:

Carey S. Clark, PhD, RN, AHN-BC
Peggy Chinn, RN, PhD, FAAN
Elizabeth Berrey, PhD, RN
Lisa Sundean, RN, MS, PhD Candidate
Adeline Falk-Rafael, PhD, FAAN
Leslie Nicoll, PhD, PhD, MBA, RN, FAAN
Sue Hagedorn, RN, PhD, FAAN

Thank you to the Cambridge Health Alliance for inspiration!

If you would like to co-sign your name to this declaration, please provide your information using this formThe list of co-signatories will be updated as frequently as possible.

SEE THE DECLARATION AND LIST OF SIGNATORIES HERE

Women, healthcare, and access issues


I have been thinking a lot lady about women’s need for healthcare and oppression of women. A lot of this thinking has been spurred on by my facebook account, which lets me know that the new administration is planning on defunding planned parenthood, cutting medicare, and possibly replace the Affordable Care Act with Health Saving’s Accounts (the last one has to be a joke…right? HSA of the average American will not pay for hospitalizations and major medical issues).

The defunding of Planned Parenthood (PP) makes little to no logical sense, as no federal money is used to support abortions (which seems to be the GOP platform reason for why PP should be de-funded). I myself used PP as a young uninsured nursing student and even when I became a nurse with no insurance. PP was in fact my primary care for many years and PP offers great care options for women.

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This year when it came to my yearly exam, instead of literally waiting 8-12 weeks for an “annual” appointment with an MD or DO, I decided to have my basic needs met through PP. They take my insurance (which I am ever so grateful for) and I could make an appointment for a few days from when I went online. I could cancel my appointment online.

When I arrived, I was pleased to see a bowl full of condoms sitting out. I was in the waiting room with one other male in his mid-20’s, it was mid-day on a Monday. When I went back to the exam room, after only waiting about 10 minutes, the MA took my weight, BP, and did a brief health history with me. An NP was with me shortly after this, and we discussed many of my overall health concerns. She did a breast exam, gynecological exam and pap smear, discussed peri-menapause with me, and she even spent a few minutes talking with me about my tween and what the latest approaches were for sexually active teens (including answering my questions about HPV and what my daughters’ experience might be like should she come to a PP for birth control when she is a teen).

I have to admit I was more comfortable here then visiting my primary care doctor, the one who is listed on my insurance. I like getting care from NPs, I trust them and appreciate the time they devote to prevention. The routine felt comfortable and I was at ease. I left with a plan to address some of my health concerns with other healthcare professionals and with an increased knowledge base around my own health and even my daughters’ future sexual health. Although my insurance paid for this health prevention visit, I made a donation to PP on the spot before I left the building.

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I want PP to be around when my daughters’ might need them in the next few years. If you feel the same, I hope you will join me in contacting your legislative body and your local PP to see how you might be of assistance. To learn more about how to contact your representative in Washington DC, please visit: http://www.house.gov/representatives/find/

 

Here’s a way to help people in crisis!


Recently I learned about the crisis text line – 741-741.  I immediately made sure my granddaughters, 10 and 12 and avid texters, knew about this line and made sure they knew how and when to use it.  It’s success is remarkable, as you can see from the TED talk by founder Nancy Lublin below. This project grew out of the much larger project – DoSomething.org – a campaign to take action and create social change on behalf of young people. 

As nurses, and as nurse manifesters, this is a terrific resource to know about, talk about and share with others. It is exactly the kind of activism that is doable, and that can make a big difference in the world. So I invite you to explore the Crisis Text Line resource!  You might even  consider applying to become a counselor! Here are some highlights to explore: